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Posts Tagged ‘Idioms’

Gild the lily with this whimsical volume!

As an amateur student of language this volume is indispensable. An idiom is “an expression that cannot be understood from the meanings of its separate words but that has a separate meaning of its own.” Don’t be boxed in by poor literal meanings, get metaphorical this season with a tried and true method. Don’t be a second-class citizen of the English Language, escape the rate race of speaking and get a leg up on the competition this year and next.

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Evan Kerry, 2013

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So I’ve had a book of definitions of Idioms for a while now. Thought I would post some of my favorites here and basically converse on the topic, no matter the length, at my whim.

The nature of the Idiom is an interesting one.  It is a matter of a cultural understanding on a broad level.  When first looking at, or better yet, when first thinking deeply about the components of an Idiom one is somewhat perplexed at the lack of meaning in the phrase. Only when another recites an example can the meaning become clear. Akin to slang, though Idioms are accepted much more, the Idiom is an everyday occurence. 

Here is a link to the Historical Dictionary of American Slang: http://www.alphadictionary.com/slang/?term=jawn&beginEra=&endEra=&clean=true&submitsend=Search

Oddly I can’t find the word Jawn.

eg. Did you see that Jawn?  or, That Jawn was smokin’!

Idioms are interesting and can be alot of fun, but what really screws up my lexicographical, linguistic burning heart is the Slang of the world. So don’t gum up my comments with all of your tripe.  Just kidding.  What is it that makes Idioms so much more acceptable than Slang?  Is it the length of time that has passed from their introduction? Is it because Slang is usually seen as of a lower order or replacing something low-down and dirty? Like language and meaning in general Slang and Idiom are highly subjective. I’m sure some deny their existence altogether and attempt on ly the Queen’s English or the DAR English, that last one I made up. But anyways it is an enjoyable topic and one destined to screw up my heart in the future.

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