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Archive for the ‘Archaic Word of the Day!’ Category

Bairn – Child

 

Ex.  ‘Dem bairns is alright wit’ me.

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Jeroboam-size/type of wine bottle.

I came across this word when reading George Saintsbury’s excellent Notes on a Cellar-Book. 

WikiPedia lists at this page here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_bottle

 

If you are further interested in wine please check out this list of wine personalities: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wine_personalities

Everyone from a Rothschild to Saintsbury is listed.

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Today’s word comes from the following website:

http://www.cummingsstudyguides.net/xArchaisms.html

Cuckold – man married to an adulteress     

“Who would not make her husband a cuckold to make him a monarch? (Emilia to Desdemona, Othello, Act IV, Scene III).    

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Heydeguye-a kind of country dance.

From Spenser’s The Shepheardes Calender, in June;

But frendly Faeries, met with many Graces,

And lightfote Nymphes can chace the lingring night,

With Heydeguyes, and trimly trodden traces,

Whilst systers nyne, which dwell on Parnasse hight,

Doe make them musick, for their more delight:

 

 If you like English Country Dance Music may I suggest this publication:

http://www.elderly.com/books/items/449-1.htm

 

Or for some aural/visual stimulation check out these contradancers:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnQNMi3skus

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2sbW0fSAX-4&feature=related

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From AskOxford.com:

varlet

/vaarlit/

  • noun 1 archaic an unprincipled rogue. 2 historical a male attendant or servant.

  — ORIGIN Old French, variant of valet (see VALET).

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From Wikipedia:



Domdaniel is a fictional cavernous hall at the bottom of the ocean where evil magicians, spirits, and gnomes meet. It was first mentioned in the continued story of the Arabian Nights by Dom Chaves and Cazotte (1788-1793). It was described as being located in the sea near Tunis. In this hall, the ruler Zatanai held his court, which included the magician Maugraby and his students.


Robert Southey later used Domdaniel in his multi-volume oriental poem Thalaba: the Destroyer (1797). The hero of Southey’s story, Thalaba, is the last surviving member of a race called the Hodeirah. It had been prophesied that the spirits of the Domdaniel were destined to be destroyed by one of the Hodeirah, so they sought the end of that race.


One of the magicians named by Southey as dwelling in Domdaniel was Adbaldar. He was selected by lot to hunt down Thal’aba and slay him. But the youth Thalaba accomplishes the destruction of the magicians in the final volume of the poem despite their efforts to kill him and his surviving family.


H. P. Lovecraft used Domdaniel in his short story, He (1925), as follows: …heard as with the mind’s ear the blasphemous domdaniel of cacophony …


Nathaniel Hawthorne used Domdaniel in his romance, The House of the Seven Gables, as follows: “Hepzibah put her hand into her pocket, and presented the urchin, her earliest and staunchest customer, with silver enough to people the Domdaniel cavern of his interior with as various a procession of quadrupeds as passed into the ark.”


Domdaniel is the headquarters of the Spanish Inquisition in Neil Gaiman‘s graphic novel Marvel 1602 and includes large underground caverns. Domdaniel secretly served as the headquarters of Grand Inquisitor Enrique and The Brotherhood of those Who Will Inherit the Earth.


The word is derived from the Latin domus meaning “house” and Danielis meaning “of Daniel“.

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